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Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

Trump Victory Speech NY Hilton (11/9/2016)

Wednesday, November 9th, 2016

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Donald Trump says some encouraging things about the United States Of America early in the morning on 11/9/2016 in New York City. As he won the presidency, his face was projected on the Empire State Building. Very New York Election.

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Garrison Keiler on the Vilification of Hillary Clinton

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

Sept 15, 2016 New York City –This one great paragraph from Garrison Keillor in today’s Washington Post is a great one, about how much the world is coming at you today with crackpot theories, magnified, of course, and in someway sometimes seemingly legitimized, by the internet. Are we living in a very unrealistic time, politically? Maybe kind of because of this?

English: Mr. Garrison Keillor

English: Mr. Garrison Keillor (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Back in the day, you occasionally saw cranks on a street corner handing out mimeographed handbills arguing that FDR was responsible for Pearl Harbor, but you saw their bad haircuts, the bitterness in their eyes, and you turned away. Now they’re in your computer, whispering that the economy is on the verge of collapse and for a few bucks they’ll tell you how to protect your savings. But lacking clear evidence, we proceed forward. We don’t operate on the basis of lurid conjecture. 

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The President Show: PAC Pushes Al Franken For Hillary’s Vp

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

Franken for Hillary VP; ‘Perfect Tonic to Trump’s Coarse Broadsides’

Franken In the all important VP Wars…this may very well be a very very strong choice.

Sen. Al Franken should be tapped to be Hillary Clinton’s vice presidential running mate, says Bill Scher, senior writer for the progressive political advocacy group Campaign for America’s Future.

“For a 2016 presidential race that’s already stranger than fiction, his party truly needs someone like Franken if it’s going to win the presidency,” Scher says of the Minnesota Democrat and former “Saturday Night Live” comic in a column written for Politico.

“[Donald] Trump’s presence demands new rhetorical weaponry. As Trump himself might say, Franken’s ‘classy’ and ‘elegant’ wit is just what the ticket needs to avoid the kind of brawl that drags everyone down to Trump’s level.

As well, writes Scher, it would allow Clinton to remain “above the fray,” with the quick-witted Franken there to “provide the buffer.”

“Franken has worked hard to prove he is a detail-oriented, issues-driven senator, not a political novelty act,” Scher says.

“Furthermore, his style of humor is deadpan and wry, the perfect tonic to Trump’s coarse broadsides. He’ll have no need or inclination to get sucked into the gutter, the way Rubio did, just to get a piece of the daily news cycle.”

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Foundation Road: Bill Gates on Energy

Saturday, February 27th, 2016

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Summary: Energy is a huge part of making life easier, healthier, more exciting, more cultural and, frankly, more energetic. 1.6 billion people live without electricity mainly in Africa and India. If Bill Gates “could have just one wish to help the poorest people, it would be to find a cheap, clean source of energy to power our world.”

2016 ANNUAL LETTER
MORE ENERGY
by Bill
At some point today, you’ll probably do one or all of these things: Flip a switch for light. Take fresh food from a refrigerator. Turn a dial to make your home warmer or cooler. Press a button on your laptop to go online.
You probably won’t think twice about any of these actions, but you will actually be doing something extraordinary. You will be using a superpower—your access to energy.
Does that sound ridiculous?
Just imagine, for a minute, life without energy.
You don’t have a way to run a laptop, mobile phone, TV, or video games. You don’t have lights, heat, air conditioning, or even the Internet to read this letter.
About 1.3 billion people—18 percent of the world’s population—don’t need to imagine. That’s what life is like for them every day.
You can see this fact for yourself in this photograph of Africa at night taken from space.

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Africa has made extraordinary progress in recent decades. It is one of the fastest-growing regions of the world with modern cities, hundreds of millions of mobile phone users, growing Internet access, and a vibrant middle class.
But as you can see from the areas without lights, that prosperity has not reached everyone. In fact, of the nearly one billion people in sub-Saharan Africa, 7 out of every 10 of them live in the dark, without electricity. The majority of them live in rural areas. You would see the same problem in Asia. In India alone, more than 300 million people don’t have electricity.
If you could zoom into one of those dark areas in that photograph, you might see a scene like this one. This is a student doing her homework by candlelight.007U0644MOV19_04_34_18Still001_800px_v02

I’m always a little stunned when I see photographs like this. It’s been well over a century since Thomas Edison demonstrated how an incandescent light bulb could turn night into day. (I’m lucky enough to own one of his sketches of how he planned to improve his light bulb. It’s dated 1885.) And yet, there are parts of the world where people are still waiting to enjoy the benefits of his invention.
If I could have just one wish to help the poorest people, it would be to find a cheap, clean source of energy to power our world.
You might be wondering, “Aren’t people just trying to stay healthy and find enough to eat? Isn’t that important too?” Yes, of course it is, and our foundation is working hard to help them. But energy makes all those things easier. It means you can run hospitals, light up schools, and use tractors to grow more food.
Think about the history classes you’re taking. If I had to sum up history in one sentence it would be: “Life gets better—not for everyone all the time, but for most people most of the time.” And the reason is energy. For thousands of years, people burned wood for fuel. Their lives were, by and large, short and hard. But when we started using coal in the 1800s, life started getting better a lot faster. Pretty soon we had lights, refrigerators, skyscrapers, elevators, air conditioning, cars, planes, and all the other things that make up modern life, from lifesaving medicines and moon landings to fertilizer and Matt Damon movies. (The Martian was my favorite movie last year.)

Without access to energy, the poor are stuck in the dark, denied all of these benefits and opportunities that come with power.

So if we really want to help the world’s poorest families, we need to find a way to get them cheap, clean energy. Cheap because everyone must be able to afford it. Clean because it must not emit any carbon dioxide—which is driving climate change.

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10 Commandments Re-envisioned: Ten Ideas For Education (All From Current American College Students)

Saturday, January 30th, 2016

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The Roosevelt Institute in Manhattan works on policy making at the student level, among other things.

Join In Shaping The Future:

The Rooosevelt Institute

570 Lexington Ave

New York, New York

(212) 444-9130

http://www.rooseveltinstitute.org/

https://www.facebook.com/Roosevelt.Institute

 

For more info on these proposals, see more detailed story below this one.

Sensible School Start Times: An Inexpensive Policy for Achievement and Health   Nathaniel Bechhofer, George Mason University

Later school start times for students attending Fairfax County middle and high schools would enhance both academic performance and student health at costs lower than other policies with benefits of a similar magnitude

 

Discouraging Discriminatory College Admissions: The Case for Reporting Need-Sensitivity  Liam Grace-Flood, Wheaton College

To help applicants navigate the deceptive world of college admissions, the U.S. Department of EducationCollege Scorecards should publish data on need-sensitivead missions.

 

Cognitive Enhancement Through Multilingualism: Empowering Students Through Elementary Dual-Language Immersion Joshua Kemp, City College of New York

New York State should incentivize early foreign language instruction through a statewide dual-language immersion education program so that elementary students may receive the benefits multilingualism provides.

 

Increasing Awareness at Cornell: Diversity Courses as a Graduation Requirement Stephanie Hahm, Cornell University

Cornell University should require undergraduates to take courses exploring ethnic, cultural, religious, and gender diversity. This requirement will engage students with conversations about diversity and prepare them for a multi-cultural society.

Cognitive Enhancement Through Multilingualism: Empowering Students Through Elementary Dual-Language Immersion Joshua Kemp, City College of New York

New York State should incentivize early foreign language instruction through a statewide dual-language immersion education program so that elementary students may receive the benefits multilingualism provides

 

Alleviating Public School Finance Inequities: Funding According to Student Characteristics Christine Kil, University of Georgia

Georgia should implement student-based budgeting base don student characteristics to ensure equitable, fully funded education.

 

Closing the Achievement Gap: Elementary Second Language Education in Philadelphia Schools Laura Pontari, University of Georgia

The Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) should create a partnership between Philadelphia public universities and the School District of Philadelphia to provide second language education for elementary school students.

 

Promoting Success for English Learners: Dual-Language Immersion in Georgia

Rahul Shah, University of Georgia

Georgia should subsidize the implementation of magnet dual-language immersion programs in public schools to support the academic achievement of English learners

 

 9 Project based Learning In Philadelphia Paul Selling, Georgetown University

The Philadelphia School District should switch from a traditional, test-based learning model to a project-based learning model to better educate students

 

10 reviving Our Roots: Reconnecting Teens to Agriculture Elizabeth Wilkes, University of Georgia

The American farmer is growing older, the American agricultural system is unsustainable, and the American teenager is not interested in farming. High schools at the rural–urban interface should implement farmer development

programs to address these nationwide issues while strengthening communities.

 

 

 

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The Third Way: A Record of Impact

Friday, January 29th, 2016

The Third Way

The Third Way is not just an idea-that it’s not about Democrats and Republicans, it’s about what works–it’s also an organization in Washington, and it is perhaps the most effective moderate organization in that city. Here is their essential record of achievement entitled a record of Impact. Sometimes people get offended by third wayers, or anyone they see as moderate. “Andrew Cuomo in New York, for instance,  has taken money from the Koch Brothers,” they will say.  Things like this.  I think what may offend people most about Cuomo are the strong armed tactics and a real keen interest in looking good though large public achievements, some of which may not be incredibly efficiently funded, and some that may or may not get done. The Third Way really should boil down to: The most effective use of public funds to “Supercharge” the economy…so that it works for everyone. As noted below, it works as a way to find common ground in many fields. But supercharging the economy so that it works really well for everyone is a HUGE plus, and I think best achieved by a moderate Third Way approach. The Clintons argue they are the best at this. I continue to hold the view that the most successful Third Wayer in History is on the Campaign trail right now: William Jefferson Clinton.

–Milon Henry Levine

 

Clean Energy

Third Way developed a new centrist approach to the climate debate.

Third Way has rejected the ideological rigidity of the climate change debate, which pits climate deniers against those who believe renewables are the only answer. We have developed a campaign to ensure the U.S. leverages all of our energy resources as part of a climate solution, with a focus on commercializing advanced nuclear energy, cutting the carbon emissions from fossil fuels, and moving freight off American roads and onto our rails and waterways. Over a dozen of our proposals have been introduced as legislation or executive orders, and three have become law.

Deficit Reduction

Third Way helped enact over $3 trillion in deficit reduction.

Third Way led the effort on the Democratic side to enact a series of bipartisan deals that reduced the ten-year deficit by $3.3 trillion. Our three-year education and advocacy campaign built support for deficit reduction that included both budget cuts and new revenue. Though these deals were far from perfect, they have eliminated the near-term deficit problem.

Entitlement Reform

Third Way has spearheaded a long-term campaign to fix the safety net.

After the 2008 election, we launched a long-term campaign to make the progressive case for fixing the broken entitlements system. In those five years, we prepared and got introduced a bill that would create a Social Security Commission, created the narrative around an impending “collision course” between entitlements and investment spending, became the leading center-left venue for entitlement reformers, and directly influenced the language and policies of top Democratic officials.

Exports

Third Way was the principal Democratic group behind three free trade agreements.

Third Way played the leading role among Democratic organizations in passing trade deals with Columbia and Panama, and we hosted the kick-off and helped shepherd through Congress the deal with Korea, the largest trade accord since NAFTA. The White House adopted Third Way’s pro-trade messages to make their case for the FTAs, and our policy papers were cited throughout the Congressional debates.

Federal Pensions

Third Way reformed federal pensions for all new employees.

In 2011, Third Way proposed a series of changes to bring federal pensions in line with the private sector. In 2012-13, Congress passed legislation that included our central idea, permanently raising the rate of federal employee retirement contribution from 0.8% to 4.4% for all new federal employees, which will save tens of billions over the next decade.

Gun Safety

Third Way fundamentally altered the gun debate.

As The Atlantic has noted, “The story of the way the gun debate changed is largely the story of Americans for Gun Safety. AGS ceased to exist in 2005… absorbed by…Third Way. But its success endures.” We helped shift the focus for gun safety advocates to the centrist notion of “rights and responsibilities.” We passed ballot initiatives in Colorado and Oregon to close the gun show loophole and a bill in Congress to improve the background check system. Every major Democratic presidential candidate of the last decade has turned to us for guidance on gun policy and messaging.

Health Care

Third Way helped shape and pass the Affordable Care Act.

Third Way fought successfully for a market-based approach to cost control in the ACA. We also developed a messaging framework built upon a series of reforms that would provide “stability and security” to the insured, and President Obama took our framework and used those exact words repeatedly, including in a speech to a joint session of Congress in September 2009. In a moment when the bill was failing, his shift to our message tipped the balance and helped pass the ACA.

Immigration Reform

Third Way won the support of moderate Senators for immigration reform.

When the initial push for comprehensive immigration reform in 2006 had lost the support of Democratic moderates, Third Way entered the debate to help shape policy arguments about a pathway to citizenship and making the U.S. a magnet for global talent. We combined that with groundbreaking public opinion research that led to a centrist framework for immigration reform—“tough, fair, and practical”—and helped persuade a number of wavering Senators to support reform. By the time another comprehensive reform bill was up for a vote on the Senate floor in 2013, every moderate Democratic senator supported using this centrist narrative it, including five who had opposed even the narrower D.R.E.A.M. Act in 2010.

Marriage for Gay Couples

Third Way’s narrative reversed decades of losses on marriage for gay couples.

By 2008, advocates of marriage for gay couples had a record of 0 for 30 at the ballot box. We conducted deep public opinion research to understand why, which revealed a serious strategic flaw: the focus on the rights and benefits of marriage was driving away Americans in the middle. To sway these critical voters, we advised advocates to emphasize instead the common value that all couples share around marriage: lifetime commitment. Our approach was widely adopted, and as a result, in part, the tide has turned. Marriage went 4 for 4 with voters in 2012, and political leaders from President Obama on down have used this “commitment” message to announce their support for allowing gay couples to marry.

Middle Class Success

Third Way developed a middle-class success agenda and turned it into legislation.

Our policy ideas on helping the middle class get ahead—including getting to and through college, managing care for an aging parent, preparing for a successful retirement, and starting a small business—have been introduced as thirty-three pieces of legislation in Congress. A number of these were also included in the agenda of the Vice President’s Middle Class Task Force.

Military Readiness

Third Way led the effort to increase the size of the wartime Army.

In 2005, the U.S. Army was nearing a breaking point. Third Way revealed the extent of the strain on the Army in a groundbreaking report, which led to legislation that Third Way initiated co-sponsored by then-Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) and Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI). That bill, which increased the size of the Army by 100,000 troops, became law in 2006. Though Third Way opposed the Iraq War, the Army end-strength increase was required to save the force from catastrophe (as happened after Vietnam). We now are pushing to modernize the military for a new era.

Use of Force

Third Way changed the debate in Congress on the Authorization for the Use of Military Force.

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The Activists S1 E1 “Cynthia Johnson” and her Fight Against Morgan Stanley

Tuesday, January 19th, 2016

Cynthia Johnson from The Georgia Pictures Company on Vimeo.

 

Last week on “The Activists” Amin Husain talked about where the Occupy Wall Street Movement is today…to augment what he said….it’s EVERYWHERE today. Its all over the campaign of Bernie Sanders…perhaps in a tiny bit of a less genuine way it’s all over Hillary Clinton’s campaign….and Trump Rubio and Cruz are, uh, thinking about it (They are also thinking about co staring togethe on Broadway in Le Cage). This is from an Occupy protest in front of Morgan Stanley in the fall…Susie Johnson (Her daughter Cynthia Johnson is pictured below) is an 80 year old woman who lost her home 14 years ago because of a mistake, according to Morgan Stanley, made by Morgan Stanley…4 misplaced paymnts that she made. We have approached ‪#‎Ronkuby‬ about this and so far have heard nothing they are also thinking about getting together to do a production of Le Cage Au Folles). Pretty sure William Moses  Kunstler would sue the crap out of Morgan Stanley on Johnson’s behalf, but I know nothing about this field…perhaps the best person around the ask….is next up on “The Activists.” The long time president of the William Moses Kunstler foundation and one of the greatest theatrical Activtsts in modern history, Randy Credico.  You don’t have to be #Ronkuby to call Jamie Dimon at 212-270 1111 to talk about it, but it wouldn’t hurt.

 

 

 

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The Activists: S1 E1 “Ed Needham Talks with Occupy Wall Street Co Founder Amin Husain”

Sunday, January 10th, 2016

The Activists S1 E6 “Ed Needham Talks with Occupy Wall Street Co-Founder Amin Husain” from The Georgia Pictures Company on Vimeo.

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The Animal Liberation Front of Israel in Action

Friday, June 5th, 2015

The activists ALF; The Animal Liberation Front of Israel from The Georgia Pictures Company on Vimeo.

The activists ALF; The Animal Liberation Front of Israel from The Georgia Pictures Company on Vimeo.

A film circulating the internet today comes from the Animal Liberation Front based in Israel.

The ALF Mission Statement:
To effectively allocate resources (time and money) to end the “property” status of nonhuman animals.

The Objective of the Mission:
To abolish institutionalized animal exploitation because it assumes that animals are property.

In our quest to highlight stories out of the middle east that are forward thinking and about positive loving measures overwhelming the hateful environment the world always sees, we though it would be interesting to start with this film. Just as aggression can be overwhelmed with intelligent, ultra compassionate defense systems…egg business, fur business all kinds of animal based businesses…can go on without unnecessary cruelty…as the ALF argues…the concepts are actually related. They say in their credo that Human Freedom and Animal Rights go hand and hand. We think its wonderful.

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Teachers’ Unions: Noble…Yes…Flexible?…Not So Much.

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

Speaking with someone from the American Federation of Teachers on 12-13-14  in DC. I came away with much more respect for Teaching Unions, and  for quite a bit of Teachers’ Unions do…but as we’re seeing with the Police Union in New York City..there can be a blanket un-nuanced vibe…after this very guy told me teaching unions never do anything wrong….I came back the next day with more of a conversational and critical tone.  However, he did have some wonderful things to say ,though. Hope to talk to these guys again…maybe a few times.

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